Thursday, 15 May 2014

Plants as memorials.

When first came to live here what is now our garden was a field. It had been cow pasture just a few years ago.

The very first thing I put in was an oak tree. David had lived in a house with a great oak in the garden when he was a boy that he used to climb and sit in to get away from the adults.

For his next birthday I bought him the largest oak tree I could find . It was already taller than he was so it was no sapling. Now I go to look at David's tree growing tall and wish he still shared it's strength and it's beauty. It will out live us all!

This week as part of one of our Christmas presents we went out to a wonderful nursery and used our plant vouchers. David's son bought his dad an acer. A very pretty shrub, with pink frilly leaves which David would have loved.

All the rest of the shrubs are going in tomorrow. Many are delicate so I've spent an afternoon trying to find enough shelter from the wind for them. There is one rose called a Rambling Rector...I've put it near a mature tall Eucalyptus. ....

The garden is becoming a memorial to David in its own way. I never walk around it without saying thank you to him for the lovely path.

When the first David died I put in a white rose for him in an already crowded garden. I had no heart to dig it up to bring it to Cornwall. So I hope it's still flowering in Essex.

As memorials , plants have their problems. A vicious winter can flatten them but mostly they are good reminders of the people they are named for...

We are nearer Gods heart in a garden than anywhere else on earth.

 

4 comments:

  1. Once again we are in complete agreement Jean. My garden has a very vigorous climbing rose "Veilchenblau" a cutting from my Dad's garden, a white hibiscus with a maroon eye a cutting from sister-in-law Ann and a tree peony and red chenomaeles wich John saw planted but didn't bloom till he was gone.
    These are all powerful reminders of those I've lost as well as being beautiful in their own right.
    Good luck with "Rambling Rector" by the way, given half a chance it will take over the whole of Cornwall.
    Love and prayers X

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    1. Much like its human counterpart then.....ahem!

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  2. Hmmm. Delusions of grandeur as well.:)

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    1. I am not the rector here...that title belongs to another! Made me laugh again.....two days running......wow!

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